Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

Consumer Guide:
  User's Guide
  Grades 1990-
  Grades 1969-89
  Expert Witness
Books:
  Going Into the City
  Consumer Guide: 90s
  Grown Up All Wrong
  Consumer Guide: 80s
  Consumer Guide: 70s
  Any Old Way You Choose It
  Don't Stop 'til You Get Enough
Writings:
  CG Columns
  Rock&Roll& [new]
  Rock&Roll& [old]
  Music Essays
  Music Reviews
  Book Reviews
  NAJP Blog
  Playboy
  Blender
  Rolling Stone
  Billboard
  Video Reviews
  Pazz & Jop
  Recyclables
  Newsprint
  Lists
  Miscellany
Bibliography
NPR
Web Site:
  Home
  Site Map
  What's New?
Carola Dibbell:
  Carola's Website
  Archive
Venues:
  Noisey
CG Search:
Google Search:
Twitter:
***

THE DRESDEN DOLLS
No, Virginia . . .
Roadrunner

Boston cabaret-punk duo believe devil-worshipping socialists need love, too

Sure, Amanda Palmer thinks she's superior to you, but that's nothing against you. It's just that she's superior to everyone, and a fat lot of good it does her. Driven by partner Brian Viglione's drums, her keyboard-dominated, cabaret-flavored satirical songs are never snobbish, snide or fey. This follow-up to 2006's Yes, Virginia--adds just five fresh ones to six worthy older non-album numbers. The new "Night Reconnaissance" is either a vividly imagined or painfully remembered tale of accused teen socialist Satanists plotting revenge against tormentors "from good homes." The detailing is equally fine on the resuscitated B-side "Lonesome Organist Rapes Page Turner," where sexual coercion comes out all right in the end (sort of). Fervent and fierce, with a half-earned world-weariness that can recall Johnny Rotten himself, the Dresden Dolls mean to make goth theatricality smart. Quite often, they do.

Blender, July 2008