Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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The saga begins when German producers Benito Benites and John Garrett III hear something they like on an obscure rap track by Providence-based, New York-produced Chill Rob G. Enlisting Cincinnati-bred GI-turned-rapper Turbo B and his session-singer cousin Penny Ford, they transform Chill Rob G's Let the Words Flow into Snap's The Power, a worldwide hip house crossover to rival Pump Up the Jam itself. The Snap lyrics are vague where Chill Rob G's are Afrocentric, but Snap's remix is far snappier, with Ford one among several telling additions. Chill Rob G objects, however, and as Power Jam Featuring Chill Rob G gets to release an Afrocentric version of the Snap remix (on Wild Pitch). So now you got two dope jams to choose from, only let me add this--anybody hooked by Snap on the radio (where the original remix was the hit) will find many more irresistibly stupid beats on the World Power album (Arista). The crazy followup single, Ooops Up, isn't even where the shit ends.

Playboy, 1994?