Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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Lou Rawls

  • She's Gone [Bell, 1975] C-

Consumer Guide Reviews:

She's Gone [Bell, 1975]
Since we've stopped resisting middle-class soul, why is Lou Rawls more objectionable than Gladys Knight? Because for Rawls, middle-class soul feels like a compromise rather than an achievement. Again and again, the sureness of his rich voice betrays a subtle disdain for what he's doing, and even worse, what he's doing often deserves it. Respectful Gladys would never settle for a song as fustian as "Hourglass" or as contrived as "Now You're Coming Back Michelle." Which is why she's irresistible. C-